For their work representing an indigent, mentally ill man who, upon arrest for DUI, was relegated to solitary confinement in Dona Ana County, N.M., where he languished without trial or mental health treatment for 22 months, Albuquerque attorneys Matthew Coyte and Jack Jacks were award the Public Justice Foundation's 2013 Trial Lawyer of the Year Award.

Behind the barbed wire of the los lunas prison, a disturbing story involving dozens of naked prisoners is laid out in graphic detail by this class action lawsuit filed this morning. It accuses warden Anthony Romero and other officers of forcing dozens of prisoners to strip to their underwear at gun point and sit a lined-position where their genitals touched eachother's backsides. They sat like that for hours, the lawsuit says, forcing one prisoner to urinate on another.

Matt Coyte, the president of the New Mexico Criminal Defense Lawyers Association, joins Nicole Brady to talk about New Mexico's revolving door justice system.

It's a list of do's and don'ts that Tai chan must follow or risk ggoing back tojail. On it, don't leave Doña Ana county - the place whre he's accused of shooting and killing 27-year old Jeremy Martin. He's not allowed to have a firearm and can't contact any vitims or potential witnesses. Matthew Coyte is president of the New Mexico Criminal Defense Lawyers Association. He says those are all normal expectations, for a case like this.

A man forgotten in solitary confinement at the Doña Ana County Detention Center wins a jury verdict of $22 million dollars following trial.

In recent weeks, both Albuquerque Police Chief Gorden Eden and District Attorney Kari Brandenburg have publicly criticized a new New Mexico Supreme Court rule ordering tighter deadlines for evidence on criminal cases.

The New Mexico Women's Correctional Facility in Grants is close to having more inmates than it can handle, but the man in charge of our state's prisons says he has a plan.

For years, the women's prison has worked to rehabilitate female inmates with programs like one that helps train dogs. But as the number of female inmates rises, it's tougher to provide the help that can change those women's lives.

ALBUQUERQUE (KRQE) – First came the lawsuit and on Wednesday a final settlement was reached after a 73-year-old grandmother was locked in solitary confinement for more than a month in a New Mexico prison.

The terms of the settlement are private, so we have no idea how much money this settlement could involve. But one attorney hopes it could have a far-reaching impact behind prison walls.

Overcrowding is a major problem at the Metropolitan Detention Center. Last Fiscal Year, it spent more than 7-million dollars to house inmates at other facilities. That's because, while the jail was built to house about 2,200 inmates, officials say, it's often held close to three-thousand. The State Supreme Court believes the problem behind these bars stems from what happens in front of a judge. That's why it has issued new rules.

A recently-filed lawsuit alleges Otero County jail guards simply stood by and watched as a female inmate in isolation lost all control of her mental state and more.

Roxanne Estrada was first picked on drug charges in Alamogordo in December 2013. She was taken to the Otero County jail, where she claims staff did nothing to help her with severe her mental illness as she spiraled into madness.

Parents understand their children. They understand how much they require, how much attention they need, how their emotional support is almost entirely dependent on their family unit. A child’s development requires socialization, interaction with adults and peers, hugs, kisses, praise, discipline and affection. Imagine removing all of that from a child’s life for nearly a year.

On this week’s Eye on New Mexico, Bernalillo County Fire spokesperson Larry Gallegos and Michelle Moore of United Blood Services talk about the Battle of the Badges, a UBS donation drive. Later, Albuquerque attorney Matt Coyte discusses solitary confinement in jails and civil rights.

Right now, there is no law regulating who can be placed in solitary confinement in New Mexico’s prisons and jails. That would change if legislators pass a bill being proposed.

House Bill 175 , The Isolated Confinement Act, is only meant to keep certain people who could be harmed as a result out of solitary confinement, according to the lawmaker backing the bill...